Understanding vs Seeing

 “People nowadays,” Wittgenstein writes in Culture and Value, “think that scientists exist to instruct them, poets, musicians, etc. to give them pleasure. The idea that these have something to teach them-that does not occur to them.” At a time like this, when the humanities are institutionally obliged to pretend to be sciences, we need more …

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A way of life

It's Spring Break (aka reading week), and I've already taken on some reading projects. I'm currently working through Daniel Dennett's Darwin's Dangerous Idea, and considering the validity of the Dawkin's meme concept, especially in relation to ethics and "sociobiology." David Widdicombe, over at St. Margaret's Anglican Church, has an interesting critique of Darwinists who reject …

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Teaching meta-cognitive skills in Psychology

One of the great advantages of teaching psychology is exploring its own identity crisis. Is it a science? A humanities? Who is a psychologist - humanists, behaviourists, evolutionary psychologists, neuroscientists? What method would we use to identify which kind of psychologist you want to be?  Are there limitations to what the scientific method can tell …

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On the limits of scientific explanations

Educational theory is considered a Social Science in the university today. Aside from the horrors of APA style (with its tyrannical and often meaningless appeals to authority), Social Science has its strengths. But the weakness of all Social Sciences is its built-in tendency to convince us that we can explain and predict societal issues with …

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